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  1. page First Grade Unit 2 edited ... other media. {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcStG-WsmoWyxqODDDsU2jZnVFu…
    ...
    other media.
    {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcStG-WsmoWyxqODDDsU2jZnVFu6P1b_zL0fWBTpaFu0NXKcpsLbiw} {tracker week 2.jpg} {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRyIPKlBW0Q8E4nRlh7wGzK6vBUycqr4E9JMdJh0gs1BFLTNiqt} {https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRxWzP_i_frRIzzLQ3f5iJGlaBEQ9LzCKdRq8e4dtrkwg7s366k} {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcROls2M2VgKeOmPtR1PTWzZRbFO_2noCcTXcnVRyaPRuZbCscvUIQ} {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT5pIeKSiNMlLwnnlSK3D2WiGqHOCm1A0sOVdVYYlU_SePu2KbnFA}
    {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS7EGTlL6JqamSwZj7-w_eTiix_XX-26oYVcfJymJXRC1eQ3nPn1A} external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS7EGTlL6JqamSwZj7-w_eTiix_XX-26oYVcfJymJXRC1eQ3nPn1A
    Terminology:
    categories
    ...
    FRY LIST http://www.uniqueteachingresources.com/Fry-1000-Instant-Words.html
    The expectation for first grade is for students to learn the first 200 words by the end of the year.
    {1ela.jpg} 1ela.jpg
    x​-Terminology for Teachers:Terminology for Teachers:
    Choral Reading: http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/choral_reading/
    (view changes)
  2. page First Grade Unit 2 edited ... LAFS.1.SL.1.2: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information …
    ...
    LAFS.1.SL.1.2: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through
    other media.
    {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcStG-WsmoWyxqODDDsU2jZnVFu6P1b_zL0fWBTpaFu0NXKcpsLbiw} external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcStG-WsmoWyxqODDDsU2jZnVFu6P1b_zL0fWBTpaFu0NXKcpsLbiw {tracker {tracker week 2.jpg} tracker week 2.jpg {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRyIPKlBW0Q8E4nRlh7wGzK6vBUycqr4E9JMdJh0gs1BFLTNiqt} external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRyIPKlBW0Q8E4nRlh7wGzK6vBUycqr4E9JMdJh0gs1BFLTNiqt {https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRxWzP_i_frRIzzLQ3f5iJGlaBEQ9LzCKdRq8e4dtrkwg7s366k} external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRxWzP_i_frRIzzLQ3f5iJGlaBEQ9LzCKdRq8e4dtrkwg7s366k {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcROls2M2VgKeOmPtR1PTWzZRbFO_2noCcTXcnVRyaPRuZbCscvUIQ} external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcROls2M2VgKeOmPtR1PTWzZRbFO_2noCcTXcnVRyaPRuZbCscvUIQ {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT5pIeKSiNMlLwnnlSK3D2WiGqHOCm1A0sOVdVYYlU_SePu2KbnFA} external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT5pIeKSiNMlLwnnlSK3D2WiGqHOCm1A0sOVdVYYlU_SePu2KbnFA
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:Interdisciplinary Connections:
    This unit teaches:
    Art: Henri Matisse
    Science: Animals (e.g., habitats, unique adaptations, and the food chain)
    This unit could be extended to teach:
    Geography: Oceans
    Science: Animals (e.g., undersea life, habitat destruction, Rachel Carson)
    {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRyIPKlBW0Q8E4nRlh7wGzK6vBUycqr4E9JMdJh0gs1BFLTNiqt} {https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRxWzP_i_frRIzzLQ3f5iJGlaBEQ9LzCKdRq8e4dtrkwg7s366k} {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcROls2M2VgKeOmPtR1PTWzZRbFO_2noCcTXcnVRyaPRuZbCscvUIQ} {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT5pIeKSiNMlLwnnlSK3D2WiGqHOCm1A0sOVdVYYlU_SePu2KbnFA}
    {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS7EGTlL6JqamSwZj7-w_eTiix_XX-26oYVcfJymJXRC1eQ3nPn1A} external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS7EGTlL6JqamSwZj7-w_eTiix_XX-26oYVcfJymJXRC1eQ3nPn1A
    Terminology:
    ...
    Define words by category and by one or more key attributes (e.g., a duck is a bird that swims).
    Use common, proper, and possessive nouns in speech and writing.
    Sample Activities: ClassActivities:Class Discussion/Reading/Informational Text
    While reading a book such as What Do You Do With A Tail Like This? (Steve Jenkins), make a chart to record the name of each animal mentioned. Write where the animal lives (i.e., its habitat), what the animal eats (i.e., whether it is an herbivore, carnivore, or omnivore) and an interesting fact (e.g., its method of adaptation) on the chart. Ask students to supply at least one piece of information on a Post-It when you are finished reading. Create and add to similar charts about animal facts as you read to the children and as they read independently. Use these charts to create oral and written sentences about the animals. (RI.1.2, L.1.5b, L.1.1j)
    Class Discussion/Reading/Informational Text
    ...
    or back
    flips).
    flips). Allow some
    ...
    to know
    the
    the information to
    ...
    the essential
    question
    question for this
    ...
    tails of
    animals.
    animals. If possible,
    ...
    an expert.
    (W.1.2,
    (W.1.2, SL.1.3, RI.1.2)
    Explanatory Writing/Art Connection
    ...
    comment about
    the
    the colors and
    ...
    the site,
    students
    students will see
    ...
    their favorite
    animal
    animal from this
    ...
    taken to
    create
    create an art
    ...
    writing later. (W.1.7)
    (SL.1.2)
    (W.1.7)(SL.1.2)
    Informative Writing/Revision
    ...
    a writing
    assignment.
    assignment. Give the
    ...
    interesting facts
    about
    about your animal
    ...
    to gather
    information.
    information. Using non-fictional
    ...
    more information
    about
    about the animal.
    ...
    adults are
    available
    available to help
    ...
    (see Art
    Connection
    Connection / Explanatory
    Literary/Vocabulary
    ...
    the story
    and
    and work on
    ...
    funny in
    the
    the story because
    ...
    Divide the
    students
    students into groups
    ...
    Let them
    know
    know that if
    ...
    solve the
    problem.
    problem. Encourage the
    ...
    that is
    what
    what makes it
    ...
    learned from
    the
    the story. (L.1.4a,
    Literary/Language
    ...
    and reread
    the
    the story. As
    ...
    baby bird
    thought
    thought might be
    ...
    dog, cow,
    boat,
    boat, plane). Sort
    ...
    each of
    the
    the categories. (L.1.5a,
    Literary
    ...
    a book.
    Using
    Using a book
    ...
    the weasel
    speaks,
    speaks, where the
    ...
    macaroni at
    each
    each table. Ask
    ...
    it means
    someone
    someone is speaking.
    Literary/Read Aloud
    ...
    retelling of
    fiction,
    fiction, give the
    ...
    object to
    prompt
    prompt the retelling.
    ...
    black paper)
    and
    and put it
    ...
    the gathered
    objects
    objects as prompts
    ...
    object for
    Common Core Curriculum Maps | Grade 1 Unit 2 | The Amazing Animal World 7/5/11 10:55 AM
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    each
    each chapter or
    Class Discussion/Art Connection
    ...
    following questions: What
    What
    animal do
    ...
    different animal? What
    What
    color is the animal? Is
    Is
    this the
    ...
    this animal? Why
    Why
    do you think
    the
    the artist chose
    Writing/Art Connection
    ...
    colors, or
    they
    they could choose
    Online Resources:
    //Adventures in Nonfiction: A Guided Inquiry Journey// (ReadWriteThink)
    ...
    The expectation for first grade is for students to learn the first 200 words by the end of the year.
    {1ela.jpg} 1ela.jpg
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:Interdisciplinary Connections:
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---This unit teaches:This unit teaches:
    Art: Pieter Bruegel (Children’s Games)
    Science: Healthy living (e.g., eating fruits and vegetables, exercise, sleep, avoiding germs)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---This unit could be extended to teach:This unit could be extended to teach:
    Science: Healthy living (e.g., body systems, Jenner, Pasteur)

    x​-Terminology for Teachers:Terminology for Teachers:
    Choral Reading: http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/choral_reading/
    ...
    Shared research: Research done together as a class or small group
    Informational text/nonfiction: Writings that convey factual information and are not primarily works of the creative imagination
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:Interdisciplinary Connections:
    This unit teaches:
    Art: Henri Matisse
    Science: Animals (e.g., habitats, unique adaptations, and the food chain)
    This unit could be extended to teach:
    Geography: Oceans
    Science: Animals (e.g., undersea life, habitat destruction, Rachel Carson)

    (view changes)
  3. page First Grade Unit 2 edited ... wide reading of a range of text types. LAFS.1.L.2.5: With guidance and support from adults, d…
    ...
    wide reading of a range of text types.
    LAFS.1.L.2.5: With guidance and support from adults, demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in
    word meanings.
    LAFS.1.L.2.5(b): Define words by category and by one or more key attributes (e.g., a duck is a bird that swims; a tiger is
    ...
    with stripes).
    LAFS.1.W.1.2: Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and
    ...
    of closure.
    LAFS.1.SL.1.2: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through
    other media.
    ...
    revision
    Suggested Objectives:
    Use pictures, illustrations,Retell stories demonstrating understanding of the central message or lesson.
    Identify the main idea
    and key details inof an informational text.
    Describe how the text groups information into general categories.
    Write an informative text about an animal, supplying factual information and providing
    a sense of closure.
    In a revision process and under the guidance and support of an adult, add details to an informative text.
    Confirming understanding of information, present orally by restating key elements and answering questions about
    key details.
    Write an explanatory
    text telling how Matisse created the mural, The Snail.
    Use sentence context clues
    to discernhelp determine word meanings.
    Define words by category
    and describeby one or more key ideas.
    Help shape research questions.
    Gather information on
    attributes (e.g., a given topic.
    Listen to one another
    duck is a bird that swims).
    Use common, proper, and possessive nouns
    in conversationsspeech and speak one atwriting.
    Sample Activities: Class Discussion/Reading/Informational Text
    While reading
    a time.
    Capitalize names, places, and dates.
    Punctuate sentences correctly with
    book such as What Do You Do With A Tail Like This? (Steve Jenkins), make a periodchart to record the name of each animal mentioned. Write where the animal lives (i.e., its habitat), what the animal eats (i.e., whether it is an herbivore, carnivore, or omnivore) and question mark.
    Perform poetry as
    an interesting fact (e.g., its method of adaptation) on the chart. Ask students to supply at least one piece of information on a choralPost-It when you are finished reading.
    Sample Activities:
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Reading Literature, Speaking
    Create and ListeningReading Literature, Speaking and Listening
    As
    add to similar charts about animal facts as you read to the book Tomaschildren and the Library Lady, pause periodically and encourage students to ask questions. By using “I wonder” as they read independently. Use these charts to create oral and written sentences about the animals. (RI.1.2, L.1.5b, L.1.1j)
    Class Discussion/Reading/Informational Text
    Before
    beginning of the question, havethis lesson, ask students predict what is coming next in the story and clarify understanding. Use sticky notesthey are experts at doing (e.g., bike riding, roller skating, or whiteboardsback
    flips). Allow some time
    to keep each child engaged in the questioning. (RL.1.1)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Informative Writing, ResearchInformative Writing, Research
    Using
    share. Remind the ABC books asstudents than an author is a model, generate some ideas for writing a class ABC book. Work together as a classreal person who has worked hard to come up with potential research questions. Begin by asking questions such as, “Is it possibleknow
    the information
    to create an ABCfill a book with Games to Playsuch as our title?” Allow the class to give some ideas (e.g., names, authors, books, plants, insects). After ideas have been shaped intoWhat Do You Do With a research question, allowTail Like This? (Steve Jenkins). Using the childrenessential
    question for this unit, ask the students
    to votethink about how authors become experts on a themetopic, such as the tails of
    animals. If possible, invite a speaker who has an expertise in something. Talk about how they became an expert.
    (W.1.2, SL.1.3, RI.1.2)
    Explanatory Writing/Art Connection
    Display the Tate’s site
    for Matisse’s The Snail using a projector and computer. Encourage students to comment about
    the colors and what they see in
    the class ABC book. Onceartwork. As you read the theme is chosen, gatherbackground information fromand move through the site,
    students will see the process used by Matisse to create his work. Students will then create
    a varietywork of texts and digital resources for each lettertheir favorite
    animal from this unit using torn pieces
    of the alphabet. Decide onpainted paper. Later, do a design forshared writing to explain the book. Assign each student a lettersteps taken to
    create an art piece
    in the book. Each page should includestyle of Matisse. This could be a model for an upper and lower case letter,explanatory piece of writing later. (W.1.7)
    (SL.1.2)
    Informative Writing/Revision
    Since
    the key word,students have now completed an illustration, andartistic masterpiece of their favorite animal, extend the work into a sentence usingwriting
    assignment. Give
    the key word.students this prompt: “Write about your favorite animal. Be sure to have them follow rules for spellinginclude interesting facts
    about your animal
    and punctuating correctly. (SL.1.1, W.1.7, W.1.2, W.1.8, L.1.1 a, L.1.1j, L.1.2b, L.1.2d, L.1.2e, RF.1.1a)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Language Mechanics, Speaking and ListeningLanguage Mechanics, Speaking and Listening
    Introduce the writing of declarative and interrogative sentences
    end with a solid closing. Allow your students to begin by focusing on an informational ABC book, such as Eatingworking in teams to gather
    information. Using non-fictional texts, remind them to use
    the Alphabet: Fruits and Vegetables from Aindex or table of contents to Z (Lois Ehlert). On a chart,locate more information
    about the animal. When they have some basic information, have them
    write a question such as “What is your favorite fruit?” Teach the studentsfirst draft. Ensure that adults are
    available
    to answerhelp with revision of the questionwriting. Display the published writing with the Matisse-style artwork (see Art
    Connection / Explanatory Writing). (W.1.2, W.1.5, RI.1.5, RI.1.10, RF.1.4)
    Literary/Vocabulary
    Read
    a complete declarative response,fictional animal story, such as “My favorite fruit is a strawberry.”Are You My Mother? (Philip D. Eastman). Discuss the end punctuation. Continue this activity to teachvocabulary in the expansion of sentences to include details, such as “Strawberries are my favorite fruitstory
    and work on retelling. Ask the students (if, for example, discussing Are You My Mother?), “What word was funny in
    the story
    because they are juicy, sweet, and delicious.” (L.1.1j, L.1.2b, W.1.5, SL.1.6)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Informative Writing, Language MechanicsInformative Writing, Language Mechanics
    Give students this prompt: “Children should eat healthy foods, exercise, and take care
    of their bodies. Name onethe way to stay healthy. Supply some facts aboutit was used?” (Possible answer: “Snort”) How did you know what it meant? Divide the topic you chose
    students into groups of three
    and provide closure athave them tell the end of your writing.” As students write, watch closelystory to each other, taking turns as each tells a part. Let them
    know
    that if they focusare stuck on just one way to stay healthy and that they compose an essay supported by facts. Encourage students to write complete sentencesa part of the story, you will come and allow them to use the correct end punctuation. (W.1.2, L.1.1j, L.1.2b)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Reading Informational Text, Speaking and ListeningReading Informational Text, Speaking and Listening
    Tell
    book to solve the
    problem. Encourage
    the students that just because books are called “ABC books” does not mean they are always easy to understand. Therefore,try to understand them, we haveremember as many details as they can to be willing to ask questions and to think deeply and look for key details. Telltell the studentsstory because that is
    what makes it interesting. When
    they are going to look at The Graphic Alphabet. Using a document camera for viewing this book would be helpful. On each page, there is a letter, but there is something more going on than just that letter. Look at A. Havefinished retelling the students ask questionsstory, talk about the page and try to answer them (e.g., “Why is the letter A crumbling? Could the letterwhat lesson might be learned from
    the story. (L.1.4a, RL.1.2)
    Literary/Language
    Follow up on
    a mountain? Is that an avalanche?”).book read previously in class, such as Are You My Mother? (Philip D. Eastman). Go back and reread
    the story.
    As you go throughread it this time, read for the bookpurpose of finding all of the animals and throughoutthings that baby bird
    thought might be his mother. As students find
    the unit, introducewords, write them on index cards (e.g., kitten, hen, dog, cow,
    boat, plane). Sort
    the new vocabulary. (RI.1.1, RI.1.7, L.1.1j, SL.1.2)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Reading Literature, Reading Informational Text, Reading Poetry, Speaking and ListeningReading Literature, Reading Informational Text, Reading Poetry, Speaking and Listening
    Throughout this unit,
    words into categories (e.g., animals, modes of transportation,). Think of more words for each of
    the categories. (L.1.5a, L.1.1b)
    Literary
    As
    students read fromindependently, remind them that different characters often tell the story at different times in a variety of texts: stories, poems, and informational texts. When you havebook.
    Using
    a ten-minute block, play “I Spy” withbook such as Mouse Tales (Arnold Lobel), allow the children (e.g., “I spy an informational book,” “I spy a nonfiction book”). The students then have to guess which book you are looking at in the display of unit books. (RL.1.5, L.1.1)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Reading Poetry, Reading Fluency, PerformanceReading Poetry, Reading Fluency, Performance
    The theme
    re-read parts of the poetry in this unit istext where the love of booksweasel
    speaks, where the mouse speaks,
    and language. By visually displayingwhere the poems (i.e., an interactive whiteboard, document camera, overhead projector, or chart paper),narrator tells the story. Provide a bowl of raw elbow macaroni at
    each table. Ask
    students will review sight words and seeto use the waymacaroni to cover the poemquotation marks in the book, reminding them that it means
    someone
    is written (i.e., with lines and stanzas). Usingspeaking. Assigning the parts to three readers will show others how dialogue works in literature. (RL.1.6)
    Literary/Read Aloud
    Choose
    a poemfantasy read-aloud, such as “Good Books, Good Times!” (Lee Bennett Hopkins) or “HowFinn Family Moomintroll (Tove Jansson). Continuing to Eat a Poem” (Eve Merriam), encouragefocus on the studentsretelling of
    fiction, give the children the opportunity
    to read with you repeatedly andretell the previous chapters by allowing them to ask questions until they understandchoose an object to
    prompt
    the poem. Poetry is easily transformedretelling. For example, when the black hat appears, find a small black hat (or cut it out of black paper)
    and put it
    into choralthe retelling basket. Before each reading (reciting) by highlighting lines from one punctuation mark totime, have the next, and then assigning groups to read those highlighted sections. (SL.1.2, RF.1.4)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Art, Speaking and ListeningArt, Speaking and Listening
    Look at Children’s Games by Pieter Bruegel. Ask
    students retell the students to study it closelystory using the gathered
    objects as prompts
    for a few minutesremembering characters and write down any questions they have about what they see. Whenevents. By the time is up,the book ends, you will have them ask their questions. Asan object for
    Common Core Curriculum Maps | Grade 1 Unit 2 | The Amazing Animal World 7/5/11 10:55 AM
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    each chapter or key event in the book—and
    the students beginwill be efficient storytellers. (RL.1.2)
    Class Discussion/Art Connection
    Select three or four works
    to ask questions aloud, write all ofview. Ask the questions onstudents the following questions: What animal do you see in this work?
    Does anyone see
    a chart (e.g., “What are they doing?different animal? What color is the animal? Is that like a hula hoop? Was this painted a long time ago? . . .”). Talk about the valuereal color of asking questions and how we begin to open our minds tothis animal? Why do you think deeply about something. (The painting was done in
    the artist chose
    the sixteenth century, andcolor he or she did?
    Writing/Art Connection
    Ask
    the artist was perhaps tryingstudents to show alldraw an animal of their choice. They will then choose to color it using the games he knew. You may wantanimal’s real colors, or
    they could choose
    to note the few toys children had—sticks, hoops, etc.) (SL.1.2)use imaginary colors. Ask
    Online Resources:
    //Adventures in Nonfiction: A Guided Inquiry Journey// (ReadWriteThink)
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  4. page First Grade Unit 2 edited {amazing First Grade Unit 2 {amazing animal world.jpg} First Grade Unit 1First Grade Unit …

    {amazingFirst Grade Unit 2
    {amazing
    animal world.jpg}
    First Grade Unit 1First Grade Unit 2
    First Grade
    Unit 2: The1-Alphabet Books and Children Who Read ThemThe Amazing Animal
    In this second six-week unit of first grade, students read informational texts about animals and learn how each animal is unique.
    Overview
    Building on the informative writing in the first unit, students focus on constructing stronger informative writing pieces. Then, students revise their work with an adult. They also learn about the creative process through the artist Henry Matisse, and create a piece of art to go with their informative writing. The class explores explanatory writing by explaining the technique used to create their own artistic works. As they read fictional texts, they learn to retell a story using details and focusing on a central message.
    {https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcThGbK0Y9mkkuAbSEiQV_-qMIBmRbphHrecjD2ruZ5mK7MZOk0t} {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTT11fLPXSsePlo0VEtnW6bp48vtCEnaDeExO-fuFjdjGxCGBiM} {https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQwsORwO5Z4jS43afdqYxz626JXyn9Q7PMNlJJ6PosnIEN2aJ7CeQ} {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRR4pWAi780J5NssLR-LtjGfds_3N1jU7HDLQnX9bwS5cVw42E-} {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRz5HuEe5wEvuG2RAGqhGcUwZYYSNsV6JYULArM8xMd_hwW6Wes}
    THEME ESSENTIAL QUESTION
    How can readingCan stories about animals teach us lessons about writing?
    End of Unit Learning/Unit Overview
    ourselves?
    Focus Standards
    RL.1.2LAFS.1.RL.1.2: Retell stories,
    ...
    message or lesson
    RL.1.5
    lesson.
    LAFS.1.RI.1.2: Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
    LAFS.1.RL.2.5:
    Explain major
    ...
    on a wide
    wide
    reading of
    ...
    of text types
    L.1.5
    types.
    LAFS.1.L.2.5:
    With guidance and support,support from adults, demonstrate understanding
    ...
    nuances in word meanings
    L.1.5(b)

    word meanings.
    LAFS.1.L.2.5(b):
    Define words
    ...
    tiger is a
    a
    large cat with stripes).
    W.1.2

    LAFS.1.W.1.2:
    Write informative/explanatory
    ...
    topic, and provide
    provide
    some sense of closure.
    SL.1.2

    LAFS.1.SL.1.2:
    Ask and
    ...
    or through other media
    other media.

    {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcStG-WsmoWyxqODDDsU2jZnVFu6P1b_zL0fWBTpaFu0NXKcpsLbiw} {trackerexternal image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcStG-WsmoWyxqODDDsU2jZnVFu6P1b_zL0fWBTpaFu0NXKcpsLbiw {tracker week 2.jpg} {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRyIPKlBW0Q8E4nRlh7wGzK6vBUycqr4E9JMdJh0gs1BFLTNiqt} {https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRxWzP_i_frRIzzLQ3f5iJGlaBEQ9LzCKdRq8e4dtrkwg7s366k} {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcROls2M2VgKeOmPtR1PTWzZRbFO_2noCcTXcnVRyaPRuZbCscvUIQ} {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT5pIeKSiNMlLwnnlSK3D2WiGqHOCm1A0sOVdVYYlU_SePu2KbnFA}
    Interdisciplinary Connections:
    Science: Animals
    habitats
    unique adaptations
    food chains
    Social Studies
    Oceans
    {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS7EGTlL6JqamSwZj7-w_eTiix_XX-26oYVcfJymJXRC1eQ3nPn1A}
    Vocabulary
    Categories
    Context clues
    informative/explanatory
    lesson
    main topic
    message
    retell
    revision
    Interdiscplinary
    tracker week 2.jpg {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRyIPKlBW0Q8E4nRlh7wGzK6vBUycqr4E9JMdJh0gs1BFLTNiqt} external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRyIPKlBW0Q8E4nRlh7wGzK6vBUycqr4E9JMdJh0gs1BFLTNiqt {https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRxWzP_i_frRIzzLQ3f5iJGlaBEQ9LzCKdRq8e4dtrkwg7s366k} external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRxWzP_i_frRIzzLQ3f5iJGlaBEQ9LzCKdRq8e4dtrkwg7s366k {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcROls2M2VgKeOmPtR1PTWzZRbFO_2noCcTXcnVRyaPRuZbCscvUIQ} external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcROls2M2VgKeOmPtR1PTWzZRbFO_2noCcTXcnVRyaPRuZbCscvUIQ {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT5pIeKSiNMlLwnnlSK3D2WiGqHOCm1A0sOVdVYYlU_SePu2KbnFA} external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT5pIeKSiNMlLwnnlSK3D2WiGqHOCm1A0sOVdVYYlU_SePu2KbnFA
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:Interdisciplinary
    Connections:
    This unit teaches:
    Art: Henri Matisse, Albrecht DürerMatisse
    Science: Animals (e.g., habitats, unique adaptations, and the food chain)
    This unit could be extended to teach:
    Geography: Oceans
    Science: Animals (e.g., undersea life, habitat destruction, Rachel Carson)
    Suggested Objectives
    Describe how a text can group information into general categories.
    Write an informative/explanatory text about a given
    {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS7EGTlL6JqamSwZj7-w_eTiix_XX-26oYVcfJymJXRC1eQ3nPn1A} external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS7EGTlL6JqamSwZj7-w_eTiix_XX-26oYVcfJymJXRC1eQ3nPn1A
    Terminology:
    categories
    context clues
    informative
    lesson
    main
    topic (e.g., about an animal), supplying factual information
    message
    retell
    revision
    Suggested Objectives:
    Use pictures, illustrations,
    and providingdetails in a sense of closure.
    In a revision process, and under the guidance and support of an adult, add details
    text to an informative text.
    Confirming understanding of information, present the information orally by restating key elements
    discern and answering questions aboutdescribe key details.
    Write an informative/explanatory text explaining how
    ideas.
    Help shape research questions.
    Gather information on a given topic.
    Listen
    to do something (e.g., how Matisse created the large-scale cut-out, The Snail).
    Use sentence context clues to help determine word meanings.
    Use common, proper, and possessive nouns
    one another in speechconversations and writing.
    Suggestd Activities:
    Reading Informational Text, Research, Informative Writing
    While reading
    speak one at a book such as What Do You Dotime.
    Capitalize names, places, and dates.
    Punctuate sentences correctly
    with a Tail Like This? (Steve Jenkins), make a chart to record the name of each animal (main topic) mentioned. Record key details, suchperiod and question mark.
    Perform poetry
    as where the animal lives (i.e., its habitat), what the animal eats (i.e., whether it is an herbivore, carnivore, or omnivore), and an interesting fact (e.g., its method of adaptation) on the chart. Ask students to supply at least one piece of information on a sticky note when you are finishedchoral reading. Create
    Sample Activities:
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Reading Literature, Speaking
    and add to similar charts about animal facts asListeningReading Literature, Speaking and Listening
    As
    you read to the childrenbook Tomas and as they read independently. Use these chartsthe Library Lady, pause periodically and encourage students to create oral and written sentences about the animals. (RI.1.2, L.1.5b, L.1.1j)
    Reading Literature, Vocabulary
    Read a fictional animal story, such
    ask questions. By using “I wonder” as Are You My Mother? (Philip D. Eastman). Discuss the vocabulary in the story and work on understanding unknown words. Askbeginning of the question, have students (if, for example, discussing Are You My Mother?), “What word was funnypredict what is coming next in the story because of the way it was used?” (Possible answer: “Snort.”) Then ask, “How did you know what it meant?” Divide the students into groups of three and have them tell the storyclarify understanding. Use sticky notes or whiteboards to keep each other, taking turnschild engaged in the questioning. (RL.1.1)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Informative Writing, ResearchInformative Writing, Research
    Using the ABC books
    as each tells a part. Let them know that if they are stuck onmodel, generate some ideas for writing a part of the story, you will allow themclass ABC book. Work together as a class to use thecome up with potential research questions. Begin by asking questions such as, “Is it possible to create an ABC book with Games to solve the problem. Encourage the students to try to rememberPlay as many details as they can for retellingour title?” Allow the story because details are what make the story interesting. When they are finished retelling the story, talk about what lesson might be learned from the story and what new words they learned. (L.1.4a, RL.1.2)
    Reading Literature, Reading Comprehension, Speaking and Listening
    Choose a fantasy read-aloud, such as Finn Family Moomintroll (Tove Jansson). Continuing
    class to focus on the retelling of fiction, give some ideas (e.g., names, authors, books, plants, insects). After ideas have been shaped into a research question, allow the children the opportunity to retellvote on a theme for the previous chapters by allowing them to choose an object to promptclass ABC book. Once the retelling. For example, providetheme is chosen, gather information from a numbervariety of props (e.g., a black hat madetexts and digital resources for each letter of construction paper), and ask students to find the appropriate object when it appears in the story and put it intoalphabet. Decide on a “retelling basket.” Before each reading time, have the students retell the story using the gathered objects as promptsdesign for remembering characters and events. By the time the book ends, you will have an object forbook. Assign each chapter or key eventstudent a letter in the book—andbook. Each page should include an upper and lower case letter, the students will be efficient storytellers. (RL.1.2)
    Reading Literature, Language Usage
    Follow up on
    key word, an illustration, and a book read previously in class, such as Are You My Mother? (Philip D. Eastman). Go back and rereadsentence using the story. As you read it this time, readkey word. Be sure to have them follow rules for spelling and punctuating correctly. (SL.1.1, W.1.7, W.1.2, W.1.8, L.1.1 a, L.1.1j, L.1.2b, L.1.2d, L.1.2e, RF.1.1a)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Language Mechanics, Speaking and ListeningLanguage Mechanics, Speaking and Listening
    Introduce
    the purposewriting of finding all of the animalsdeclarative and things that baby bird thought might be his mother. As students find the words, write theminterrogative sentences by focusing on index cards (e.g., kitten, hen, dog, cow, boat, plane). Sort the words into categories (e.g., animals, modes of transportation). Think of more words for each of the categories. This activity could also be done with a poeman informational ABC book, such as “The Pasture” or “I Know AllEating the Sounds the Animals Make.” After readingAlphabet: Fruits and rereading (reciting) the poem, gather the nouns in the poem and sort them accordingVegetables from A to categories (e.g., places, animals, sounds). (L.1.5a, L.1.1b)
    Reading Literature, Language Mechanics
    As students read independently, remind them that different characters often tell the story at different times in
    Z (Lois Ehlert). On a book. Usingchart, write a bookquestion such as Mouse Tales (Arnold Lobel), allow“What is your favorite fruit?” Teach the students to reread parts ofanswer the text where the weasel speaks, where the mouse speaks, and where the narrator tells the story. Provide elbow macaroni at each table. Ask students to place the macaroni on the quotation marks in the book, reminding them that it means someonequestion with a complete declarative response, such as “My favorite fruit is speaking. Assigninga strawberry.” Discuss the partsend punctuation. Continue this activity to three readers will show others how dialogue works in literature. (RL.1.6)
    Art, Informative Writing
    Since
    teach the students have now completed an artistic masterpieceexpansion of theirsentences to include details, such as “Strawberries are my favorite animal, extend the work into a writing assignment. Give thefruit because they are juicy, sweet, and delicious.” (L.1.1j, L.1.2b, W.1.5, SL.1.6)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Informative Writing, Language MechanicsInformative Writing, Language Mechanics
    Give
    students this prompt: “Write about your favorite animal. Be sure“Children should eat healthy foods, exercise, and take care of their bodies. Name one way to include interestingstay healthy. Supply some facts about your animalthe topic you chose and include a catchy beginning, some facts, and a strong ending.” Allowprovide closure at the end of your writing.” As students write, watch closely that they focus on just one way to beginstay healthy and that they compose an essay supported by working in teamsfacts. Encourage students to gather information. Using nonfiction texts, remind themwrite complete sentences and to use the index or table of contents to locate more information about the animal. When they have some basic information, have them write the first draft. Ensure that adults are available to help with revision of the writing. Display the published writing with the Matisse-style artwork (see Informative/Explanatory Writing [Art Connection]).correct end punctuation. (W.1.2, W.1.5, RI.1.5, RI.1.10, RF.1.4)
    Art, Informative Writing
    Ask the students to draw an animal of their choice. They will then color it using the animal’s real colors, or they could choose to use other colors. Students may also choose to do either a realistic or abstract version of their animal. Ask the students to write an informative/explanatory text based on their drawing, using their choice of realistic or creative coloring. (W.1.2)
    Reading
    L.1.1j, L.1.2b)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Reading Informational Text, Speaking and ListeningReading
    Informational Text,
    ...
    and Listening
    Before beginning this lesson, ask

    Tell the
    students whatthat just because books are called “ABC books” does not mean they are experts at doing (e.g., bike riding, roller skating, or back flips). Allow some timealways easy to share. Remindunderstand. Therefore, to understand them, we have to be willing to ask questions and to think deeply and look for key details. Tell the students that an author is a real person who has worked hardthey are going to know the information to filllook at The Graphic Alphabet. Using a document camera for viewing this book such as What Do You Do withwould be helpful. On each page, there is a Tail Like This? (Steve Jenkins). Askletter, but there is something more going on than just that letter. Look at A. Have the students to thinkask questions about how authors become experts on a topic, such as the tails of animals. If possible, invitepage and try to answer them (e.g., “Why is the letter A crumbling? Could the letter be a speaker who has expertise in something. Talk about how they becamemountain? Is that an expert. Talk about why this makes informational texts betteravalanche?”). As you go through the book and how having good information can help improve one’s writing. (RI.1.2, SL.1.3)
    Art,
    throughout the unit, introduce the new vocabulary. (RI.1.1, RI.1.7, L.1.1j, SL.1.2)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Reading Literature, Reading Informational Text, Reading Poetry, Speaking and ListeningReading Literature, Reading Informational Text, Reading Poetry,
    Speaking and Listening
    Select three or four works to view (e.g., the Klee, Chagall,

    Throughout this unit, students read from a variety of texts: stories, poems,
    and Dürer). Askinformational texts. When you have a ten-minute block, play “I Spy” with the children (e.g., “I spy an informational book,” “I spy a nonfiction book”). The students the following questions: What animal dothen have to guess which book you seeare looking at in the display of unit books. (RL.1.5, L.1.1)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Reading Poetry, Reading Fluency, PerformanceReading Poetry, Reading Fluency, Performance
    The theme of the poetry
    in this work? Does anyone see a different animal? What colorunit is the animal? Is this the real colorlove of this animal? Why do you thinkbooks and language. By visually displaying the artist chose the color hepoems (i.e., an interactive whiteboard, document camera, overhead projector, or she did? Begin to introducechart paper), students will review sight words and see the concept of abstraction (versus realism) by comparingway the Dürer imagepoem is written (i.e., with either the Kleelines and stanzas). Using a poem such as “Good Books, Good Times!” (Lee Bennett Hopkins) or “How to Eat a Poem” (Eve Merriam), encourage the Chagall. Askstudents to read with you repeatedly and to ask questions like: Is this exactly what a rabbit looks like? What about a cat? A picture of a cow? How can we telluntil they understand the difference? What waspoem. Poetry is easily transformed into choral reading (reciting) by highlighting lines from one punctuation mark to the artist tryingnext, and then assigning groups to do? (SL.1.1.b, SL.1.3, SL.1.4)
    Art, Informative Writing
    Using a projector
    read those highlighted sections. (SL.1.2, RF.1.4)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---Art, Speaking
    and computer, displayListeningArt, Speaking and Listening
    Look at Children’s Games by Pieter Bruegel. Ask
    the Tate’s website for Matisse’s The Snail. Encourage students to commentstudy it closely for a few minutes and write down any questions they have about the colors and what they see insee. When the artwork.time is up, have them ask their questions. As you read the background information and move through the site, students will see the process Matisse usedbegin to create his work. Students will then create a workask questions aloud, write all of their favorite animal fromthe questions on a chart (e.g., “What are they doing? Is that like a hula hoop? Was this unit using torn pieces of painted paper. Later, do a shared writing in whichlong time ago? . . .”). Talk about the students explain the steps takenvalue of asking questions and how we begin to create an art pieceopen our minds to think deeply about something. (The painting was done in the stylesixteenth century, and the artist was perhaps trying to show all of Matisse. This activity could be a model for a piece of informative/explanatory writing later. (W.1.7, SL.1.2)the games he knew. You may want to note the few toys children had—sticks, hoops, etc.) (SL.1.2)
    Online Resources:
    //Matisse for Kids// (The Baltimore Museum of Art)
    //Edward Lear home page//
    //Investigating Animals:
    //Adventures in Nonfiction: A Guided Inquiry Journey// (ReadWriteThink)
    //Book Sorting:
    Using Nonfiction for Inquiry-based Research// (ReadWriteThink)(W.1.7)
    //Animal Study: From Fiction
    Observation and Comprehension to Facts//Categorize Books// (ReadWriteThink) (RL.1.5)
    //Robert Frost reads "The Pasture//" (The Poetry Foundation)

    Sample Block:
    Familiar Reading (15 min)
    Circle Time/Modeled Writing (15 min)
    Shared Reading (20 min)
    Small Group Assisted Learning (20 min for each group)
    Phonemic Awareness (10 min)
    Litter Identification/Sound Work (20 min)

    Read Works Passages/Lessons:
    Ready for Cold Weather
    Aloud (15 min)
    Writing (40 min)

    Sight Words
    FRY LIST http://www.uniqueteachingresources.com/Fry-1000-Instant-Words.html
    The expectation for first grade is for students to learn the first 200 words by the end of the year.
    {1ela.jpg} 1ela.jpg
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:Interdisciplinary Connections:
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---This unit teaches:This unit teaches:
    Art: Pieter Bruegel (Children’s Games)
    Science: Healthy living (e.g., eating fruits and vegetables, exercise, sleep, avoiding germs)
    x​-Interdisciplinary Connections:---This unit could be extended to teach:This unit could be extended to teach:
    Science: Healthy living (e.g., body systems, Jenner, Pasteur)
    x​-Terminology for Teachers:Terminology for Teachers:
    Choral Reading: http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/choral_reading/
    Conventional Spelling: dictionary spelling of words.
    Phonetic Spelling: students use invented spelling that follows general phonics rules
    Research questions: Questions asked about a topic under investigation
    Shared research: Research done together as a class or small group
    Informational text/nonfiction: Writings that convey factual information and are not primarily works of the creative imagination

    (view changes)

Thursday, August 18

  1. page Second Grade Unit 6 edited ... Focus Standards for the Unit: LAFS.2.RL.2.4: Describe how words and phrases (ex regular bests…
    ...
    Focus Standards for the Unit:
    LAFS.2.RL.2.4: Describe how words and phrases (ex regular bests, alliteration, rhymes and repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem or song.
    LAFS.2.RL.3.10LAFS.2.RL.4.10 By the
    LAFS.2.SL.2.5 Create audio recordings of stories or poems; add drawings or other visual displays to stories or recounts of experiences when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
    LAFS.2.RI.3.8 Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.
    LAFS.2.RI.3.10LAFS.2.RI.4.10 By the
    LAFS.2.W.1.1 Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic of book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because, and also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section
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    11:49 am
  2. page First Grade Unit 5 edited ... Focus Standards LAFS.1.RI.1.3 Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas …
    ...
    Focus Standards
    LAFS.1.RI.1.3 Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas or pieces of information in text
    LAFS.1.RI.3.10LAFS.1.RI.4.10 With prompting
    LAFS.1.RF.4.4 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension
    LAFS.1.RF.4.4(c) Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary
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    11:49 am
  3. page Kindergarten Unit 6 edited ... How does nature inspire us as readers, writers and artists? Theme Focus Standards RL.K.10 …
    ...
    How does nature inspire us as readers, writers and artists?
    Theme Focus Standards
    RL.K.10LAFS.K.RL.4.10 Actively engage
    ...
    and understanding.
    RI.K.8

    LAFS.K.RI.3.8
    With prompting
    ...
    a text.
    RI.K.9

    LAFS.K.RI.3.9
    With prompting
    ...
    or procedures).
    R.K.4

    LAFS.K.R.2.4
    Read emergent-reader
    ...
    and understanding.
    W.K.6

    LAFS.K.W.2.6
    With guidance
    ...
    with peers
    L.K.4

    LAFS.K.L.2.4
    Determine or
    ...
    and content.
    L.K.4(b)

    LAFS.K.L.K.2(b)
    Use the
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    {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS7EGTlL6JqamSwZj7-w_eTiix_XX-26oYVcfJymJXRC1eQ3nPn1A}
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    11:48 am
  4. page Kindergarten Unit 5 edited ... Unit Overview/End of Unit Learning Theme Focus Standards RL.K.3 LAFS.K.RL.1.3 With promp…
    ...
    Unit Overview/End of Unit Learning
    Theme Focus Standards
    RL.K.3LAFS.K.RL.1.3 With prompting
    ...
    a story.
    RL.K.9

    LAFS.K.RL.3.9
    With prompting
    ...
    familiar stories.
    RI.K.9

    LAFS.K.RI.3.9
    With prompting
    ...
    or procedures).
    W.K.6With

    LAFS.K.W.2.6With
    guidance and
    ...
    with peers.
    W.K.8

    LAFS.K.W.3.8
    With guidance
    ...
    a question.
    L.K.2

    LAFS.K.L.1.2
    Demonstrate command
    ...
    when writing.
    L.K.2(d)

    LAFS.K.L.1.2(d)
    Spell simple
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    {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS7EGTlL6JqamSwZj7-w_eTiix_XX-26oYVcfJymJXRC1eQ3nPn1A}
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    11:46 am
  5. page Kindergarten Unit 4 edited ... End of Unit Learning/Overview Theme Focus Standards RI.K.1 LAFS.K.RI.1.1 With prompting .…
    ...
    End of Unit Learning/Overview
    Theme Focus Standards
    RI.K.1LAFS.K.RI.1.1 With prompting
    ...
    a text.
    SL.K.4

    LAFS.K.SL.2.4
    Describe familiar
    ...
    additional detail.
    W.K.7Participate

    LAFS.K.W.3.7Participate
    in shared
    ...
    about them).
    L.K.1

    LAFS.K.L.1.1
    Demonstrate command
    ...
    or speaking.
    L.K.1(f)

    LAFS.K.L.1.1(f)
    Produce and
    ...
    language activities.
    L.K.2

    LAFS.K.L.1.2
    Demonstrate command
    ...
    when writing.
    L.K.2(d)

    LAFS.K.L.1.2(d)
    Spell simple
    {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcStG-WsmoWyxqODDDsU2jZnVFu6P1b_zL0fWBTpaFu0NXKcpsLbiw} {tracker week 2.jpg} {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRyIPKlBW0Q8E4nRlh7wGzK6vBUycqr4E9JMdJh0gs1BFLTNiqt} {https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRxWzP_i_frRIzzLQ3f5iJGlaBEQ9LzCKdRq8e4dtrkwg7s366k} {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcROls2M2VgKeOmPtR1PTWzZRbFO_2noCcTXcnVRyaPRuZbCscvUIQ} {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT5pIeKSiNMlLwnnlSK3D2WiGqHOCm1A0sOVdVYYlU_SePu2KbnFA}
    {https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS7EGTlL6JqamSwZj7-w_eTiix_XX-26oYVcfJymJXRC1eQ3nPn1A}
    (view changes)
    11:45 am

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