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Life Lessons: Week 3

Objectives:
  • Describe characters, key events, and the setting in a story. (RL.1.3)
    Identify who is speaking in a story or fable.(RL.1.3)
    Distinguish between the information provided by the pictures or illustrations in a text and the information provided by the words.(RI.1.6)
    Using time cue words, providing some details, and ending with a sense of closure, write narratives that include at least two sequenced events. (W.1.3)
    With the help of an adult, revise narratives. (W.1.3)
    Produce complete sentences with correct past, present, or future verb tenses. (W.1.3)
    Use end punctuation for sentences: periods, question marks, and exclamation points. (L.1.2b)
    Relate the use of punctuation to the way a text should be read expressively. (L.1.2b)



    Assessment
    Product :
    After students dictate the sentences while you write them on sentence strips. To practice handwriting and correct sentence construction, have the students copy some of the sentences. Sentences such as these can be illustrated and compiled in a book titled Lunchroom Manners. (RI.1.6)
    Optional: A follow-up to this lesson would be a humorous list of lunchroom manners inspired by Prelutsky and Silverstein and written in poetic form.

  • Key Questions (match Standard)Why is it important to have good manners? (SL.1.4)
    Does your sentence go along with your picture? (RI.1.6)
  • Observable Student BehaviorsStudents will be able to correct sentence construction and practice handwriting.

Suggested Activities:
  • Read “Hello! Goodbye!” And “I’m making a list” (Where the sidewalk ends, page 37). Discuss what manners are and how to address people. This will introduce the idea of manners to the students before looking at table manners specifically.
  • One of the life lessons focused on in this unit is manners. With the students, create a list of “table manners” using a book such as Manners (Aliki) and Table Manners I and II from “Goops and how to be them.” Students should dictate the sentences while you write them on sentence strips. In this writing lesson, focus on writing complete sentences with subject-verb agreement. To practice handwriting and correct sentence construction, have the students copy some of the sentences. Sentences such as these can be illustrated and compiled in a book titled Lunchroom Manners. A follow-up to this lesson would be a humorous list of lunchroom manners inspired by Prelutsky and Silverstein and written in poetic form, (such as Where the sidewalk ends: “Ridiculous Rose” and “With his mouth full of food”

Additional Resources:
Ridiculous Rose on YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUH4RpDF40g
Ridiculous Rose: http://www.ece.vill.edu/~palle/poem.html
Shel Silverstein classroom bookkit
http://www.shelsilverstein.com/pdf/classroom.pdf